Physical Education

Teachers

  • Max Dyer (Director of Learning)
  • Nicola Dyer (Assistant Director of Learning)
  • Josh Delmon
  • Kelly Delmon (Assistant Director of Learning)
  • Luke Gander
  • Simon Marsden
  • Rose Newman
  • Adam Sherwood
  • Karen Street
  • Rob Wilkinson
  • Richard Winton

Physical Education in Key Stage 3

Curriculum Intent: PE at HCC aims to encourage all students to actively engage in lifelong physical activity, not only as a performer but in roles as a leader, coach or official. Students will develop a deep knowledge and understanding of sports, health, and fitness. It is our vision for every student to succeed and achieve their potential as well as enjoy physical, active lifestyles.

Key stage 3 PE offers a broad curriculum of sporting activities for students, which allows them to develop a wide range of skills and techniques with the ability to use tactics, strategies, and compositional ideas to perform successfully. Students are given the opportunity to analyse a range of different situations and apply their own decisions. At HCC, PE allows pupils to work as individuals or in groups and teams, promoting the concept of fair play alongside personal and social development. They take on different roles and responsibilities, including performer, leader and official. Through the range of experiences that PE offers, they learn how to be effective in competitive, creative, and challenging situations.

Each activity will be taught for 9 lessons to allow students the chance to develop their skills, fitness and understanding of the rules and regulations of the activity.

The department teaches theory as part of its curriculum at KS3. This content, which is delivered through practical PE lessons, allows students to increase their knowledge and understanding of physical activity concepts from an early age. This breaks down barriers of PE being seen a purely a practical subject and ultimately better prepares our students for KS4 PE and BTEC Sport.

Topics (Term 1-6)Content LearntHigh Performing students will:
Year 7
Aesthetic

Athletics

Invasion games
Trampoline
Gymnastics

Track: Sprints, middle distance, long distance, relay
Field: Discus, shot, javelin, long jump, triple jump

Rugby Union
Basketball
Netball
Dodgeball
Understand:
Reasons for participation in physical activity – mental and social reasons

Components of physical fitness – body composition, aerobic endurance, strength (muscular), speed, flexibility, muscular endurance

Fitness tests for components of fitness – BMI test, Forestry step test, Grip dynamometer test, 35m sprint test, sit and reach test, 1-minute sit up/press up test

Three phases of warming up – pulse raiser, static and dynamic stretching

Two phases of cooling down – low intensity activity, active and passive stretches

Heart rate when exercising – definition, what happens when you exercise, trends with activity intensity

Major muscle groups – hamstrings, quadriceps, gastrocnemius, biceps, triceps, deltoids

Year 8

Aesthetic

Athletics

Invasion games

Net games

Striking and fielding games

Wet weather lessons


Trampoline
Gymnastics

Track: Sprints, middle distance, long distance, relay
Field: Discus, shot, javelin, long jump, triple jump

Rugby Union
Basketball
Netball
Unihoc

Table tennis
Volleyball
Tennis

Cricket
Stoolball
Rounders

Football
Danish longball
Benchball
Indoor athletics

Unihoc
Fitness training
Benefits of Physical Education – mental and social reasons

Components of skill related fitness – agility, balance, co-ordination, power, reaction time

Fitness tests – illionois agility run, vertical jump test, multi-stage fitness

Bones – Scapula, Clavicle, Cranium, Sternum, Tibia, Fibula, Radius, Ulna

Joints – Ball and socket, hinge

Muscles, Biceps and triceps, hamstrings and quadriceps, deltoid, pectorals, gastrocnemius, abdominals, gluteals

Movement – flexion and extension, rotation, abduction, and adduction

Year 9

Aesthetic

Athletics

Invasion games

Net games

Striking and fielding games

Wet weather lessons
Trampoline
Gymnastics

Track: Sprints, middle distance, long distance, relay
Field: Discus, shot, javelin, long jump, triple jump

Rugby Union
Basketball
Netball
Dodgeball
Unihoc

Table Tennis
Volleyball
Tennis

Cricket
Stoolball
Rounders

Football
Danish Longball
Benchball
Indoor
What Sports Leaders are:
For example, sports coaches, fitness instructors, school/college coaches, local club coaches, national club coaches, amateur coaches.

What Attributes should Sports Leaders have:
Skills (communication, organisation of equipment, knowledge)
Advanced skills (activity structure, target setting, use of language, evaluation)
Qualities (appearance, enthusiasm, confidence)
Additional qualities (leadership style, motivation, humour, personality).

What responsibilities Sports Leaders should have:
Core responsibilities (professional conduct, health and safety, equality)
Wider responsibilities (insurance, child protection, legal obligations, ethics and values, rules, and regulations).

Types of sports activities:
For example, what are, individual sports, team sports, fitness activities.

What components must be included in sports activity sessions:
Warm-up.
Main component/components of activity, e.g., skill introduction, development, conditioned game & final activity
Cool down.

What information the Plan must include:
Participants, e.g., age, ability, gender, numbers, medical, specific needs
Aims and objectives, e.g., target setting, expected outcomes
Resources, e.g., equipment, time, environment
Health and safety considerations (risk assessment and informed consent).

What must be included in a Leadership session:
A demonstration of attributes (skills, advanced skills, attributes, additional qualities)
Completion of core responsibilities
Completion of wider responsibilities.

Measures of success:
Coverage of planned components
Meeting set aims and objectives
Organised
Safe.

What your review of the sessions must have:
Feedback for review, e.g., from participants, supervisor, observers, self-analysis
Methods, e.g., questionnaires, comment cards, observation records, direct verbal feedback
Strengths and areas for improvement (demonstration of attributes, completion of responsibilities, e.g., planning, content, organisation, health and safety, achievements).

Development targets:
SMARTER targets (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, time-related, exciting, recorded)
Development plan
Aims and objectives
Goals
SMARTER targets
Activities & opportunities – training, courses, qualifications
Possible barriers.

Level 2 BTEC Sport Award

The skills learnt in studying a BTEC First will aid progression to further study and prepare learners to enter the workplace in due course. In the sport sector, typical employment opportunities may include working as a coach or as a fitness instructor.
BTECs are vocationally related qualifications, where learners develop knowledge and understanding by applying their learning and skills in a work-related context. Additionally, they are popular and effective because they engage learners to take responsibility for their own learning and to develop skills that are essential for the modern-day workplace.

What will I learn?

BTEC Firsts in Sport can help you take your first steps towards a career in sport and fitness. You’ll learn essential skills such as training for personal fitness, encouraging sports participation, and organising and leading events and activities.

How will I be assessed?

You will complete four units in total, units one and two are compulsory units with unit one being assessed as an online exam. All other units are completed in assignment format which are marked internally by your teachers. Each year Edexcel will sample a selection of folders externally as part of the verification process.

Where will it lead?

BTECs can give you a variety of options, such as:
• Qualifying you to pursue a particular job or work in a particular industry
• The opportunity to study a new qualification
• The opportunity to undertake an Apprenticeship.
If you pass your BTEC and would like to continue studying, you could choose a qualification at the next level. For example, if you have completed a BTEC Level 2 First, you may consider a BTEC Level 3 National, AS/A levels, an NVQ, a BTEC Apprenticeship or a mixture of these qualifications.

How can Parents/Carers help?

Encouraging learners to watch or read up to date sports news is a great help.  To have a good knowledge of fitness, leadership and practical sports performance.

For more information contact Mr M Dyer, Director of Learning for Physical Education.

A-level Specification at a glance:

Paper 1:

 

Section A: Applied anatomy and physiology

Section B: Skill acquisition

Section C: Sport and society

Written Paper

35%105 marks

 

2 hour written paper

Combination of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions including use of data

Paper 2:

 

Section A: Exercise physiology   and biomechanics

Section B: Sport psychology

Section C: Sport and society and technology in sport

Written Paper

35%105 marks

 

2 hour written paper

Combination of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions including use of data

Coursework :

 

Practical performance in   physical activity and sport – 15%

Written analysis and   evaluation of performance – 15%

NEA

30%90 marks

 

One activity (45   marks) plus written analysis and evaluation (45 marks)

Internal assessment, external moderation

Year group or Course title

BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Sport

Course content

The course consists of 3, 7 or 12 units and is100% coursework.

The units are:-

The principles of anatomy and physiology.

The physiology of fitness.

Assessing risk in sport.

Fitness training and programming.

Sports Coaching.

Sports Development.

Fitness testing for sport and exercise.

Practical Team Sports.

Outdoor and Adventurous activities.

Leadership in Sport.

Psychology for sports performance.

Rules,regulations and officiating in sport.

Assessment

The assessment is 100% coursework based, with some of the coursework relating to practical experiences.

Equipment Needed

Appropriate sports wear for each practical lesson.

Pens, pencils and other stationary.

Homework

Homework will be set regularly and must be completed within deadlines.

Enrichment opportunities

A range of clubs take place to enhance skills in a variety of sports.

Also BTEC clinic is available to students to improve their levels beyond the lesson time for assessed tasks.

Year group or Course title

Community Sports Leaders Award.

Course content

The course consists of two main areas:-

Community leadership – 10 hours.

Theory of Leadership – 1 hour a week.

Assessment

The assessment is 100% coursework based, with much of the coursework relating to leadership experiences in the community.

Equipment Needed

Appropriate sports wear for each practical lesson.

Pens, pencils and other stationary.

Professional sportswear for community events.

Homework

Homework will be set regularly and must be completed within deadlines.

Enrichment opportunities

A range of community activities will take place of which you will be expected to help lead.

Year group or Course title

Higher Sports Leaders Award.

Course content

The course consists of practical events to complete Community leadership – 30 hours.

Theory of Leadership – 1 hour a week.

Assessment

The assessment is 100% based on your portfolio, which must include a log of hours completed in the community events..

Equipment Needed

Appropriate sports wear for each practical lesson.

Professional sportswear for community events.

Homework

None

Enrichment opportunities

A range of community activities will take place of which you will be expected to help lead.